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  • B

    B&P Consulting
  • / Real Estate is Our Passion

    We see ourselves as advisors for institutional as well as private investors. Our goal is to accompany complete transactional processes in the field of real estate – from the decision making on the right asset until the measurable success of the investment.

    | + |

  • P

    Philosophie
  • / Consistency and Reliability Form Our very Foundation

    In times when speed and change determine the daily routine – and quality falls behind in favor of time advantages – we focus on financial and material sustainability. In order to do so we only enter business relationships in which the quality of our task can be measured through transparency and reliability. Our highest maxim is the long-lasting trust of our clients and partners.

    | Advisory |

  • A

    Advisory
  • / Optimization Builds the Core of Our Consultancy

    The B & P Consulting Ltd. offers competent, all-round advisory, regarding any matter concerning your real estate property. As an extensive service provider, we accompany our clients on both sides, leading them through the complex process of selling or acquiring.

    Our focus lies on private mid-cap investors from all over the world, who wish to capitalize on the advantages of the german real estate market. Our competent team of advisors helps them to overcome the bureaucratic barriers and facilitate investments between five and ten million euros.
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    | News |

    Where to buy property in Germany

    Germany offers an immense variety of natural, historic and cultural attractions. It is a wealthy nation and Europe's second most populous, an economic and export powerhouse with a long tradition of technological leadership.

    Since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1986 after 28 years of the partition of its East and West sides, Germany has become a peaceful and unified nation.

    There are vast stretches of unspoilt landscape in this land in the heart of Europe, with forests, hills, mountains, lakes, and waterways. Its coastal areas boast splendid beaches. The agricultural areas have miles of beautiful countryside.

    Many ancient palaces, charming old towns, castles, and villages can be seen in Germany's fairytale landscape. While some areas, especially major cities and ports, were devastated during World War II, much fine architecture from ages past has survived and been lovingly restored, such as the massive gothic cathedral in Cologne, and the medieval towns along the romantic route in the South.

    Theatres, concert halls, and opera houses abound in Germany's towns and cities. Many delightful festivals are also celebrated throughout the country, the most famous of which are the Bayreuth Opera Festival and the Berlin Film Festival, both held yearly. German beer and wines are also celebrated in the famous Oktoberfest, and the harvest wine festivals throughout September, along Germany's wine routes, with its region having its own types.

    Germany's major cities, especially Berlin, Frankfurt, and Munich, are modern, futuristic and are big centres of shopping and nightlife, and sources of history and culture. There are many fashionable stores and countless pubs, bars, restaurants, and cafes in these vibrant cities.

    The peak season for visiting Germany is from May to September, when the weather is at its finest. The climate tends to be unpredictable, with rain almost half the year. It is quite cold from November to March, with short days and below-freezing weather, but the Bavarian ski resorts are a main attraction at this time of the year.

    Large and varied, Germany is divided into 16 federal states, each with its own unique character.

    17.07.17

    Investment in alternative property sectors set to take off in Europe

    Alternative property investment sectors in Europe are likely to be boosted by urbanisation and demographics with the UK leading the way, followed by Germany and Sweden, new research suggests.

    Long term trends will boost segments such as the Private Rented Sector (PRS), student accommodation, care homes and hospitality, according to international real estate investment manager Savills Investment Management (Savills IM).

    Key attractions in these alternative sectors include long leases, indexed rental uplifts, better covenants and the potential to diversify portfolios. Prime yields are now at or below 6%, with scope for further compression as these markets develop and mature, says the Savills IM report.

    Savills IM believes that the key sectors set to see strong activity this year include the PRS, automotive, hospitality and socio-infrastructure markets in the UK, Germany, France, the Netherlands, the Nordics and increasingly Spain.

    The largest alternative real estate market is in the UK, with €9.9 billion in 2015, followed by Germany at €5.2 billion and Sweden at €3.5 billion.

    Whole article: http://www.propertywire.com/news/europe/investment-alternative-property-sectors-set-take-off-europe/

    11.04.17

    Spectacular 2016 end-of-year rally seamlessly continues with sensational start to 2017

    Düsseldorf, 5 April 2017 – According to Colliers International, €12.2bn were invested in German commercial real estate in Q1 2017. This is the second time that transaction volume has exceeded €10bn since the 2007 record year, in line with the excellent performance seen in the first quarters of 2014 and 2015. Transaction volume is up 48% from Q1 2016 and even 67% above the ten-year average.

    “In Q4 2016 there were already signs that the spectacular end-of-year rally would continue into 2017. Many of the deals ready to be signed at the end of 2016 were finalized in the first months of the new year,” comments Ignaz Trombello MRICS, Head of Investment at Colliers International Germany. These deals include a pan-European Ikea warehouse store portfolio, the German share of which was sold to a fund held by British asset management company Pradera at a purchase price in the mid-9-figure range.

    In contrast to the previous year, investment activity was generally characterized by portfolio deals, with €4.2bn changing hands for portfolios in the first three months of 2017, twice as much as in Q1 2016. This reflects a 35% share in total transaction volume. The Hansteen portfolio, comprised of 100 German logistics assets and sold for €980m to a joint venture involving Blackstone and M7 Real Estate, accounted for just shy of one quarter of total transaction volume alone. The German share of the Melody portfolio consisting of two shopping centers took third place after the Hansteen and Ikea portfolios, also going for a purchase price in the mid-9-figure range. One of the largest single deals in Q1 was the Munich project Kap West, which was snapped up by Allianz before development.

    Read full article: http://www.colliers.com/en-gb/germany/insights/market-news/17_04_05_investment_germany_q1_2017

    17.05.17

    Germany overtakes UK as most active European commercial property market

    Germany overtook the UK as the most active commercial property market in Europe in 2016 with transactions totalling €59 billion, according to the latest research.

    Although investment volumes declined 14% year on year, global real estate advisor Knight Frank reports that Germany was established last year as Europe’s safe haven due to its robust economy and relative political stability and the diversity of its property markets.

    Approximately 55% of the total transaction volume was spread over seven key cities in 2016 of Berlin, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Munich, Cologne, Dusseldorf and Stuttgart with second tier cities such as Leipzig attracting unprecedented levels of investment.

    Over 60% of investment transactions in 2016 involved German buyers, as competitive pricing started to price out overseas investors, the report points out, adding that occupier demand is characterised as strong, with Berlin and Munich recording rental growth and rents in Frankfurt remaining at a high level.

    It is Berlin’s emergence as one of Europe’s pre-eminent creative hubs that has seen the city post record levels of office take up for the past three years, the report says, and as a result it is a compelling proposition for investors with transactions totalling €5.7 billion in 2016.

    The report also points out that as mainland Europe’s leading financial centre, Frankfurt is host to more than 230 national and international banking institutions and in 2016 saw the highest level of leasing activity since the global financial crisis of 2007 with 530,000 square meters let.

    For full article: http://www.propertywire.com/news/europe/germany-overtakes-uk-active-european-commercial-property-market/

    03.04.17

    Where to buy property in Germany

    Germany offers an immense variety of natural, historic and cultural attractions. It is a wealthy nation and Europe's second most populous, an economic and export powerhouse with a long tradition of technological leadership.

    Since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1986 after 28 years of the partition of its East and West sides, Germany has become a peaceful and unified nation.

    There are vast stretches of unspoilt landscape in this land in the heart of Europe, with forests, hills, mountains, lakes, and waterways. Its coastal areas boast splendid beaches. The agricultural areas have miles of beautiful countryside.

    Many ancient palaces, charming old towns, castles, and villages can be seen in Germany's fairytale landscape. While some areas, especially major cities and ports, were devastated during World War II, much fine architecture from ages past has survived and been lovingly restored, such as the massive gothic cathedral in Cologne, and the medieval towns along the romantic route in the South.

    Theatres, concert halls, and opera houses abound in Germany's towns and cities. Many delightful festivals are also celebrated throughout the country, the most famous of which are the Bayreuth Opera Festival and the Berlin Film Festival, both held yearly. German beer and wines are also celebrated in the famous Oktoberfest, and the harvest wine festivals throughout September, along Germany's wine routes, with its region having its own types.

    Germany's major cities, especially Berlin, Frankfurt, and Munich, are modern, futuristic and are big centres of shopping and nightlife, and sources of history and culture. There are many fashionable stores and countless pubs, bars, restaurants, and cafes in these vibrant cities.

    The peak season for visiting Germany is from May to September, when the weather is at its finest. The climate tends to be unpredictable, with rain almost half the year. It is quite cold from November to March, with short days and below-freezing weather, but the Bavarian ski resorts are a main attraction at this time of the year.

    Large and varied, Germany is divided into 16 federal states, each with its own unique character.

    21.03.17

    Property boom in Germany as investors choose real estate over stocks

    Property is well and truly booming in Germany's big cities. From Munich in the south to Hamburg in the north, tenants and buyers face steep increases as more people move into urban areas. Jenny Witt reports.

    Apartments in Munich, Berlin, Hamburg and Frankfurt already cost the equivalent of 10 to 15 years' earnings. And those prices are rocketing, according to a study for the German Postbank. In Hamburg, apartment prices rose by 70 percent between 2010 and 2015. They are expected to surge by another 50 percent by 2030. A three-room flat can cost around $450,000 (400,000 euros) in residential areas close to the city center.

    Even though most people still rent their apartments, real estate is an increasingly attractive option. Rents have risen for years. With interest rates at record lows, many feel they may as well borrow money to buy their own property.

    Many investors also now view bricks and mortar as a far safer and more lucrative investment than shares, which have suffered from huge volatility in recent years.

    As a result, rents and property prices are rising simultaneously. This puts real pressure on people on low or average incomes. Young families in particular can have real difficulty finding an affordable apartment with enough space. There are flyers pleading for help with the flat hunt on lampposts all over the city. Some are so desperate that they offer 500 or even 1,000 euros just to find a place to live.

    Apartment viewings often turn into mass events, with 50 or 60 would-be tenants turning up at an appointment. Many bring application portfolios with detailed information on their earnings, their creditworthiness and their family situation. There are only 92 apartments for every 100 households in Hamburg.

    Government needs to do more to control the rents?

    Almost everyone walking along the scenic Isekanal in Eimsbüttel, a popular part of the city, has a story about their long and expensive apartment search. One woman says she has just managed to buy a house in order to leave the pricey rental market. Another passer-by says it took one and a half years before she and her husband were able to rent a flat:
    "Either they are too expensive or someone else gets them. In the end we found an apartment through our relations. But we spent 18 months searching, with application folders and so on. In the end you get really fed up. We both earn decent wages, and I would have thought it would be simpler. The rents are crazy."

    Another woman feels that the government needs to do more to control the rents. "People just can't afford it. They have to have two salaries and even then they can't make ends meet."

    The federal government has tried to slow down rent increases by letting tenants provide but the measure has not yet made a noticeable difference.

    Hamburg's administration has just pledged to give the go-ahead for 10,000 new apartments each year. A proportion is to be let at lower rents. Like many big cities, Hamburg is witnessing an influx of residents and a shortage of living space. More than 100,000 people are expected to arrive by 2030.

    They come to find jobs or a better life. The city's economy is thriving. There has been a 15-percent increase in employment over the past five years. Many of those employees are well-paid and willing to buy apartments in the wealthier areas.

    Quelle: http://www.dw.com/en/property-boom-in-germany-as-investors-choose-real-estate-over-stocks/a-19549272

    21.11.16

    German house prices are on fire!

    Germany's housing market price rises have been accelerating for several months. In a country where the housing market has historically been extraordinarily stable, this is a significant shift. The reasons? Strong economic growth, 1.1 million refugees, high work-related immigration, weak construction supply and low interest rates.

    The German hedonic price index rose by 8% (7.6% inflation-adjusted) during the year to August 2016 (hedonic indices attempt to compare like-for-like exactly, so are the best measure of house price trends). This is up from a 5.8% rise (5.6% inflation-adjusted) during the same period the previous year, based on Europace figures.

    Apartment prices rose 9.6% y-o-y (9.2% inflation-adjusted), compared to the 5.4% y-o-y (5.2% inflation-adjusted) growth during the same period last year.

    New home prices rose somewhat more than existing homes.

    The German housing market was one of the few that avoided a slump in the wake of the 2008-2009 global financial crisis.